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Client: Annette Habel

Falling Bodies (Summer Solstice) © Annette Habel

Falling Bodies (Winter Solstice) © Annette Habel

Falling Bodies (76) © Annette Habel. Produced as a C-type print 244x127cm, 2009.

Falling Bodies (66) © Annette Habel. Produced as a C-type print 244x127cm, 2009.

Falling Bodies (83) © Annette Habel. Produced as a C-type print 244x127cm, 2009.

Falling Bodies (3) © Annette Habel. Produced as a C-type print 244x127cm, 2009.

Annette Habel – Artists Statement:

My interventions are rooted in a deep sense of curiosity – a desire to see. To me, the camera is an instrument of discovery and surprise: it can reveal the normally invisible, moments too fast for the human eye to register, inner processes, states of being.

My work owes much to the camera’s peculiar relationship with time. It is one of Photography’s paradoxes that inanimate objects remain sharp while the living tend to blur and disappear; comparable perhaps to the quantum particles whose location and speed, according to Heisenberg, cannot be determined at once. I would argue that our fascination with things elusive is caused by the tickle of simultaneous failure and reassurance, the tension between knowing and not knowing.

Fall:

The work shown here sprang from my wish to record, in detail, the event and process of falling. ‘Falling Bodies’ was shot in a specially constructed studio and yielded four life-sized lambda prints of people falling from height.

The narrative of falling, or The Fall – epitomized by Adam and Eve, Ikarus, or Lucifer – alludes to notions of temporality and mortality, but also emancipation: the fateful passing from one state to another.

Having been shown at The Cass Gallery (now Bank Space) and Dartington Trust, the prints were installed in an ancient Devon woodland in 2015. Here, exposed to the elements, they are spending the final chapter of their lives.

In handing them to nature and observing their process of dissolution, I have been struck by the visual quality of their decay as the print layers have been gradually stripped back: it is as if they have begun a new life.

The two images ‘Summer Solstice’ and ‘Winter Solstice’ were taken around their respective times of year.

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