Luke Watson Awarded the London College of Communication MA Student Mentorship 2019

Installation of 'Witness Objects' by Luke Watson, 2019

The Generals Shoe, Witness Object, 2019 © Luke Watson

The Generals Shoe, Witness Subject, 2019 © Luke Watson

Grenade, Witness Object, 2019 © Luke Watson

Grenade, Witness Subject, 2019 © Luke Watson

Icar, Witness Object, 2019 © Luke Watson

Icar, Witness Subject, 2019 © Luke Watson

Un/known Soldiers, Witness Object, 2019 © Luke Watson

Un/known Soldiers, Witness Subject, 2019 © Luke Watson

Vegetable Oil Tin/Watering Can/Spy Camera, Witness Object, 2019 © Luke Watson

Vegetable Oil Tin/Watering Can/Spy Camera, US Embassy, 2019 © Luke Watson

Stove, Witness Object, 2019 © Luke Watson

Stove, Witness Subject, 2019 © Luke Watson

As part of our dedication to the next generation of creative practitioners, Genesis is delighted to support MA students at London College of Communication with an award comprised of: £500 credit towards our professional printing and finishing services; a year’s mentoring from our very own Creative Director, Mark Foxwell; and a VIP ticket to Photo London (which admits two).

The bursary award winner was chosen by Mark Foxwell, Genesis’ Creative Director, who had the difficult choice of picking just one recipient from a multitude of practitioners each displaying interesting and thought-provoking works.

The 2019 Genesis Imaging Bursary Award recipient is Luke Watson, who we very much look forward to working with on the production of his future work.

Luke Watson on his winning project, ‘Witness Objects’

‘Witness Objects is one of seven case studies carried out using various methodologies, to begin to engage with a complex set of narratives, interpretations and perspectives in a place defined by conflict.

Depicted are a series of modified objects which have played some role in conflicts ranging from WWI to the Siege of Sarajevo – part of the extensive collection at the History Museum of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

The objects were witnesses to a timeframe of events associated with war, designed to perform, protect or survive violent acts. They are symbol, artefact, evidence and memory. Their temporary modification into pinhole cameras has given them an unexpected new function, transitioning them from a passive object into a potentially active tool. The object has the ability to record, survey and observe. Scenes depicted have tentative yet symbolic connections to the object/camera.

The work references the repetitive and cyclical nature of conflict, the blurring of fact and fiction and the untold stories that go undocumented.’

Visit Luke’s Website

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