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Caroline's Ribcage and Heart. Image: Dave Farnham, Wellcome Images.
Caroline's Ribcage and Heart. Image: Dave Farnham, Wellcome Images.
Caroline's Ribcage and Heart. Image: Dave Farnham, Wellcome Images.
Caroline's Ribcage and Heart. Image: Dave Farnham, Wellcome Images.
Image © Dave Farnham
Xray box tests © Dave Farnham
Image, produced as a Duratran print © Dave Fanrham.
Life Drawing 009, produced as a Duratran print © Dave Fanrham.
Life Drawing 009 © Dave Farnham
Life Drawing 009 © Dave Farnham
MRI Life Drawing Axial © Dave Farnham
MRI Life Drawing Axial © Dave Farnham
Whole body © Dave Farnham
Whole body © Dave Farnham
Dave Farnham, solo show 2008. Image © Dave Farnham.
Dave Farnham, solo show 2008. Image © Dave Farnham.
From the series 'The Unknown Soldiers' © Dave Farnham
From the series 'The Unknown Soldiers' © Dave Farnham
From the series 'The Unknown Soldiers' © Dave Farnham
From the series 'The Unknown Soldiers' © Dave Farnham
From the series 'The Unknown Soldiers' © Dave Farnham
From the series 'The Unknown Soldiers' © Dave Farnham
Toy Soldiers I © Dave Farnham
Toy Soldiers I © Dave Farnham
Toy Soldiers II © Dave Farnham
Toy Soldiers II © Dave Farnham
Toy Soldiers III © Dave Farnham
Toy Soldiers III © Dave Farnham
Toy Soldiers IIII © Dave Farnham
Toy Soldiers IIII © Dave Farnham
War Scene I © Dave Farnham
War Scene I © Dave Farnham
War Scene II © Dave Farnham
War Scene II © Dave Farnham

Dave Farnham – Artists Statement:

‘My arts practice challenges traditional approaches to mark making and sculpture. Previously, I have used pyrotechnic fuse wire to “draw” with, depicting light and dark within varying compositions. However, my more recent pieces represent an on-going body of work that aim to re-think life drawing and figurative sculpture.

I am driven by my passion for process and am constantly exploring new mediums and techniques when creating my works. By amalgamating art, medical technologies and new modes of printing, I am able to capture the internal make-up of the subject and replicate individual physiology. These works therefore play with the notion of traditional life drawing / sculpture in so much as, whilst they still explore the figurative nature of a subject/object, in capturing the unseen, internal physiology of the “sitter”, they are able to expose the ultimate fragility of the subject, thereby creating an allegorical representation of life and it’s delicate nature.’